Transmissions From The Heart – Silence (Pat Collins, 2012)

After four documentary features, whose subjects have included Gabriel Byrne, Abbas Kiarostami and John MaGahern, Pat Collins has made his first feature film, of sorts. Silence follows the travels of Sound-Recordist Eoghan (Eoghan Mac Giolla Bhride) who leaves Berlin for the North and West coasts of his native Ireland, to record areas bereft of man-made sounds.

I say it’s a feature film of sorts, because Collins uses the mechanics and devices of documentary cinema to outline Eoghan’s journey.  This is a feature film that feels like a documentary.  There isn’t a narrative beyond us being told that Eoghan is undertaking this trip for work. There isn’t a script as such either, but rather, Eoghan chats with various characters he meets along the way; all of which feels “real” and unscripted. It’s an intriguing idea. Perhaps in using these techniques, Collins is trying to get at some authenticity, some “truth” about the world which pure fiction can’t deliver.

We first see Eoghan about his work in Berlin; recording the ambience of the busy streets, bustling with trams, traffic, cars and people. It’s quite a change then when he lands in Ireland, searching out ever more remote places to set up his mics and recording equipment. There is some humour, in that even in seemingly remote areas, the sound of man’s industry can still be heard; diggers confound Eoghan’s recording attempts in one instance. In one of his encounters, Eoghan tells a man he’s recording places free of man-made sound; “but you’re here”, the man sagely replies, to which Eoghan says, “aye but I’m keeping quiet”.

Silence tries to locate this idea of “keeping quiet” amid the multi-platform-everything-all-the-time 21st Century we now find ourselves in. It’s a film which searches for space to reflect, for meaning, for the opportunity to journey inward. It’s a meditation on time, memory and loss. Is Eoghan somehow trying to find a way to extend the present, or to hold onto the past, by recording it and playing it back? Nothing is made explicit, the film’s power works on a slow, steady accretion of detail and observation.

While Richard Kendrick’s beautiful cinematography is worthy of mention, it is also worth remarking on the soundtrack and sound design. Fittingly, and perhaps obviously, Silence is also a film about sound – the sound of the natural world, the sound of our urban busyness, the sound of people sitting in houses talking and sometimes singing.  The sound of us.

Silence is on current release and is also available to buy or rent from Volta.ie

Watch the trailer

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